, Later on, Bottinius complains: "If I might read instead of print my speech, -/ Ay, and enliven speech with many a flower / Refuses obstinately blow in print / As wildings planted in a prim parterre, a poem saturated with tropes like Robert Browning's The Ring and the Book, pp.245-325, 1971.

, The Cambridge Companion to Contemporary Irish Poetry, p.69

L. Macneice, Modern Poetry: A Personal Essay, op.cit, p.92

, Translation, indeed, comes from the Latin translatio, and literally designates the process by which something is carried (latum) across (trans)

J. Lecercle, La violence du langage, p.6, 1996.

. Famously, Mallarmé writes : "le vers: lui, philosophiquement rémunère le défaut des langues, complément supérieur, Stéphane Mallarmé, p.364, 1945.

J. Moulin, Louis MacNeice -The Burning Perch, op.cit, p.11

A. Haberer and L. Macneice, l'homme et la poésie, p.700, 1981.

L. Macneice, Varieties of Parable, p.14

A. Haberer and L. Macneice, , pp.358-375

L. Macneice, Modern Poetry: A Personal Essay, op.cit, p.175

L. Macneice, Selected Literary Criticism of Louis MacNeice, p.98, 1987.

P. Macdonald and L. Macneice, The Poet in his Contexts, op.cit, p.389

L. Macneice, Selected Literary Criticism of Louis MacNeice, op.cit, p.247

T. S. , 295) -a phrase also quoted by MacNeice in the third section of, 1951.

V. Hugo, Gazing at the stars is therefore not as preposterous as one might think at first glance. In MacNeice's "Star-Gazer" the dark reverie reveals "a mystical sense of man's position in the universe 37 ". MacNeice is then very close to Saint-John Perse when, in his Nobel Prize speech, the latter describes how science and poetry follow the same pattern of exploration of the unknown, and how they complement each other: "et c'est la poésie, alors, non la philosophie, qui se révèle la vraie 'fille de l'étonnement' 38, Les Orientales : Les Feuilles d'automne, Paris, Gallimard, 1966. Like a poet, Thales is interested in "the essence of man" and things. The question raised by the maid-servant's reaction: is Thales just an absent-minded man, or is he, according to Socrates, a brilliant thinker too? Henri Bergson, in his brilliant study of laughter, naturally supports the view of Socrates, pp.16-17, 1938.

T. Platon, . Parménide, and F. Paris, , pp.174-175, 1967.

H. Bergson and L. Rire, , p.10, 2004.

L. Macneice, Varieties of Parable, op. cit, p.15

S. Perse, , p.168, 1963.