Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Abdominal tuberculosis in a low prevalence country

Abstract : Objective Abdominal tuberculosis is a rare disease. The clinical and radiological manifestations are non-specific and the diagnosis is difficult. Our objective was to describe the characteristics and treatment of patients presenting with abdominal tuberculosis in a low-incidence country. Patients and methods We reviewed the clinical, diagnostic, treatment, and outcome features of patients presenting with abdominal tuberculosis diagnosed by bacteriological and/or histological results and managed in five French university hospitals from January 2000 to December 2009. Results We included 21 patients. The mean diagnostic delay was 13 months. Twelve patients (57%) came from a low-incidence area and only two had a known immunosuppressed condition. Eighteen patients (86%) presented with abdominal symptoms. The main organs involved were the peritoneum (n = 14, 66%), the mesenteric lymph nodes (n = 13, 62%), and the bowel (n = 7, 33%). Sixteen patients (76%) underwent surgery, including two in an emergency setting. Seventeen patients (81%) received six months or more of anti-tuberculosis treatment. Finally, 16 patients (76%) had a positive outcome. Conclusion New diagnostic procedures, and especially molecular biology, may help diagnose unusual clinical presentations of tuberculosis. Invasive procedures are frequently necessary to obtain samples but also for the treatment of digestive involvement.
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/hal-01491854
Contributor : Simpa Ul <>
Submitted on : Friday, March 17, 2017 - 2:43:40 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, August 27, 2020 - 11:36:03 AM

Identifiers

Citation

A. Fillion, P. Ortega-Deballon, S. Al-Samman, A. Briault, C. Brigand, et al.. Abdominal tuberculosis in a low prevalence country. Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses, Elsevier Masson, 2016, 46 (3), pp.140 - 145. ⟨10.1016/j.medmal.2016.02.003⟩. ⟨hal-01491854⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

355