Stakeholders' perceptions of transferability criteria for health promotion interventions: a case study - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles BMC Public Health Year : 2014

Stakeholders' perceptions of transferability criteria for health promotion interventions: a case study

(1, 2) , (1, 2) , (1, 3) , (4) , (1, 2, 3)
1
2
3
4

Abstract

Background The effects of health promotion interventions are the result not only of the interventions themselves, but also of the contexts in which they unfold. The objective of this study was to analyze, through stakeholders’ discourse, the characteristics of an intervention that can influence its outcomes. Methods This case study was based on semi-structured interviews with health promotion stakeholders involved in a regional program (PRALIMAP). General hypotheses on transferability and on how the intervention is presumed to produce its effects were used to construct an interview guide. Interviews were analyzed using thematic coding. Results Twenty-three stakeholders were interviewed. Results showed stakeholders made few references to population and environment characteristics. Three themes emerged as significant for the stakeholders: implementation modalities and methodology, modalities used to mobilize actors; and transferability-promoting factors and barriers. Conclusion Our work contributes to a better understanding not only of transferability factors, but also of stakeholders’ perceptions of them, which are just as important, because those perceptions themselves are a factor in mobilization of actors, implementation, and transferability.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
1471-2458-14-1134.pdf (318.87 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Publisher files allowed on an open archive
Loading...

Dates and versions

hal-01573570 , version 1 (09-08-2017)

Identifiers

Cite

Justine Trompette, Joëlle Kivits, Laetitia Minary, Linda Cambon, François Alla. Stakeholders' perceptions of transferability criteria for health promotion interventions: a case study. BMC Public Health, 2014, 25, pp.137 - 137. ⟨10.1186/1471-2458-14-1134⟩. ⟨hal-01573570⟩
236 View
155 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More