INTRODUCTION: According to public health surveys, vaccination of men against human papillomavirus (HPV) can contribute to decrease the spread of HPV and thereby reduce the risk of genital warts and HPV-related cancers. The incidence of head and neck cancers is increasing among young men as a result of transmission of HPV by oral sex. French guidelines only propose HPV vaccination for girls. This study was designed to assess the acceptability of HPV vaccination among male adolescents and to identify barriers to this vaccination. METHODS: From May to June 2013, an anonymous questionnaire with closed answers was distributed to 882 male students in five randomly selected high schools in Lorraine. RESULTS: Of the 328 respondents, 47% had heard of HPV, 79% knew that HPV was responsible for cervical cancer but only 39% knew that HPV caused genital warts and 67% thought that HPV vaccination only protected girls. The lack of knowledge associated with the poor perception of being at risk could explain the majority of the 41% undecided subjects. CONCLUSION: Information campaigns including men concerning the risk of HPV infection should help to increase acceptability.

Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/hal-02314569
Contributor : Paolo Di Patrizio <>
Submitted on : Saturday, October 12, 2019 - 8:25:25 PM
Last modification on : Sunday, October 13, 2019 - 1:01:44 AM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-02314569, version 1

Collections

Citation

Abélia Gellenoncourt, Paolo Di Patrizio. INTRODUCTION: According to public health surveys, vaccination of men against human papillomavirus (HPV) can contribute to decrease the spread of HPV and thereby reduce the risk of genital warts and HPV-related cancers. The incidence of head and neck cancers is increasing among young men as a result of transmission of HPV by oral sex. French guidelines only propose HPV vaccination for girls. This study was designed to assess the acceptability of HPV vaccination among male adolescents and to identify barriers to this vaccination. METHODS: From May to June 2013, an anonymous questionnaire with closed answers was distributed to 882 male students in five randomly selected high schools in Lorraine. RESULTS: Of the 328 respondents, 47% had heard of HPV, 79% knew that HPV was responsible for cervical cancer but only 39% knew that HPV caused genital warts and 67% thought that HPV vaccination only protected girls. The lack of knowledge associated with the poor perception of being at risk could explain the majority of the 41% undecided subjects. CONCLUSION: Information campaigns including men concerning the risk of HPV infection should help to increase acceptability.. Santé publique (Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France), 2014. ⟨hal-02314569⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

9