Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Pirates, Slavers, Brigands and Gangs: the French terminology of anticolonial rebellion, 1880–1920

Abstract : During the most rapid period of French colonial expansion (roughly 1880–1914) the French faced regular, often violent, resistance to the expansion of their imperial dominion over people in Africa and Southeast Asia. This article examines the changing terminology that French soldiers, officers and administrators used to describe the anticolonial movements they were called upon to suppress during the course of French conquest and ‘pacification’ operations. This terminology is gleaned both from archival sources, as well as from the so-called ‘grey literature’ of books, letters and pamphlets published by members of the French military, which do not exist in traditional libraries and holdings like the Bibliothèque Nationale. Taken as a whole this analysis grants us insight into how the French thought about themselves, their anticolonial opponents, how these conceptions changed over time, and how these conceptions translated into action and methodology.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadata

https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/hal-03209215
Contributor : Mickael Mathieu <>
Submitted on : Tuesday, April 27, 2021 - 9:54:12 AM
Last modification on : Friday, April 30, 2021 - 1:40:04 PM

Links full text

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Julie D’andurain, Jonathan Krause. Pirates, Slavers, Brigands and Gangs: the French terminology of anticolonial rebellion, 1880–1920. French History, Oxford University Press (OUP), 2017, 31 (4), pp.495-511. ⟨10.1093/fh/crx054⟩. ⟨hal-03209215⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

22