L'art des trinitaires en Europe : XIIIe-XVIIIe siècles

Abstract : The trinitarian order was born at the end of the twelth century thanks to Jean de Matha and Félix de Valois. This order quickly spread especially in France and in Spain, and then it split up in three groups at the end of the sixteenth century. The trinitarian were in charge of the ransom of the Christian captives in the islamic territories. They always cared for joining with the populations they looked after. In most of the european countries, the order was gradually removed between the end of the eighteenth and the first half of the nineteenth century. The buildings and the works of art the trinitarian always ordered during their very rich history often suffer from a lack of repute. The architecture shows that the trinitarian always wanted to melt into the local scenery. Many ornemental borrows from the peculiar artistic expressions are the best proof, only except the pompous intervention of Borromini at the roman monastery called San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, in which the Spanish discaled trinitarian brothers lived. The iconographic study of the pictures the trinitarian produced shows an artistic creating which is traditional and at the same time adapted to the very language of the institution. Besides, this study allows to complete the biography and the catalogue of well-known artists and to reveal the existence of several masters, sometimes trinitarian, who had been forgotten.
Document type :
Theses
File URL :
http://docnum.univ-lorraine.fr/prive/BUL_T_2000_0015_LIEZ_1.pdf
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/tel-01776256
Contributor : Administrateur Du Ccsd <>
Submitted on : Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 3:55:45 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 1:32:36 AM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : tel-01776256, version 1

Collections

Citation

Jean-Luc Liez. L'art des trinitaires en Europe : XIIIe-XVIIIe siècles. Art et histoire de l'art. Université Nancy 2, 2000. Français. ⟨NNT : 2000NAN21015⟩. ⟨tel-01776256⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

25