Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

Abstract : Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score !5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score !5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46– 11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the specialty (OR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.32–8.38); attending national and international academic conferences and meetings (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.09–5.43); and using academic theoretical learning supports several times a week (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.11– 4.49). This study showed weaknesses in the theoretical learning framework during residency. I-SB was independently associated with quality of academic theoretical learning, academic career achievements, and the use of evidence-based medicine in everyday clinical practice.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadata

Cited literature [28 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/hal-01679837
Contributor : Ngere Ul Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 11:33:31 AM
Last modification on : Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 4:16:45 AM

File

Information_seeking_Behavior_D...
Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Identifiers

Citation

Abderrahim Oussalah, Jean-Paul Fournier, Jean-Louis Guéant, Marc Braun. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice. Medicine, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2015, 94 (6), ⟨10.1097/MD.0000000000000535⟩. ⟨hal-01679837⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

525

Files downloads

1265