Hygraula nitens, the only native aquatic caterpillar in New Zealand, prefers feeding on an alien submerged plant

Abstract : Hygraula nitens is a New Zealand native moth with aquatic larvae that feed on submerged aquatic plants. The larvae have been mainly observed using native Potamogeton and Myriophyllum species as a food source, although some studies reported larvae feeding on the alien macrophytes Hydrilla verticillata, Lagarosiphon major and Ceratophyllum demersum. Experimental mesocosm studies showed larvae had a major effect on H. verticillata, C. demersum, L. major, Elodea canadensis and Egeria densa. In both no choice and choice experiments H. nitens larvae showed a clear preference for and the highest consumption of C. demersum, while the native macrophyte Myriophyllum triphyllum ranked fourth out of five alien and two native plant species, indicating a preference of the larvae for alien macrophytes. Additional choice experiments using C. demersum, sampled from different waters in NZ, illustrated that there was a clear difference in H. nitens preference for plants based on their source. However although C. demersum had the lowest leaf dry matter content (LDMC) compared with the other macrophytes, neither the LDMC nor leaf carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus or total phenolic contents alone could explain the preferences of H. nitens, and we conclude that food choice is based on a combination of these and/or additional factors.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/hal-01779999
Contributor : Liec Ul <>
Submitted on : Friday, April 27, 2018 - 10:25:59 AM
Last modification on : Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 11:46:03 AM

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Petra Redekop, Elisabeth Gross, Andréïna Nuttens, Deborah Hofstra, John Clayton, et al.. Hygraula nitens, the only native aquatic caterpillar in New Zealand, prefers feeding on an alien submerged plant. Hydrobiologia, Springer, 2018, 812 (1), pp.13 - 25. ⟨10.1007/s10750-016-2709-7⟩. ⟨hal-01779999⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

122