The effect of camelina oil on vascular function in essential hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome - Université de Lorraine Access content directly
Journal Articles The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Year : 2022

The effect of camelina oil on vascular function in essential hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome

Anne Blanchard

Abstract

Background The effects of a dietary supplementation with the vegetable omega-3 α-linolenic acid (ALA) on cardiovascular homeostasis are unclear. In this context, it would be interesting to assess the effects of camelina oil. Objective This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of camelina oil in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods In a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study, treated essential hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome received during 6 months either cyclodextrin-complexed camelina oil containing ≈ 1.5 g ALA/day (n = 40), or an isocaloric placebo (n = 41), consisting in the same quantity of cyclodextrins and wheat starch. Anthropometric data, plasma lipids, glycemia, insulinemia, creatininemia, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and n-3, n-6 and n-9 fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes were measured. Peripheral and central blood pressures, arterial stiffness, carotid intima-media thickness and brachial artery endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation and endothelium-independent dilatation were assessed. Results Compared to placebo, camelina oil increased ALA (mean ± SD: 0 ± 0.04 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06%, P < 0.001), its elongation product eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 0 ± 0.5 vs. 0.16 ± 0.65%, P < 0.05), and the n-9 gondoic acid (0 ± 0.04 vs. 0.08 ± 0.04%, P < 0.001). No between-group difference was observed for cardiovascular parameters. However, changes in flow-mediated dilatation were associated with the magnitude of changes in EPA (r = 0.26, P = 0.03). Compared to placebo, camelina oil increased fasting glycemia (–0.2 ± 0.6 vs. 0.3 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; –0.8 ± 2.5 vs. 0.5 ± 0.9, P < 0.01) index, without affecting plasma lipids, or inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. Changes in HOMA-IR index were correlated with the magnitude of changes in gondoic acid (r = 0.32, P < 0.01). Nutritional intake remained similar between groups. Conclusion ALA supplementation with camelina oil did not improve vascular function but adversely affected glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome Whether this adverse effect on insulin sensitivity is related to gondoic acid enrichment, remains to be elucidated.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
CARDIOMEGA-AJCN.pdf (913.74 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
CARDIOMEGA - supplements.docx (160.65 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
CARDIOMEGA - supplements.pdf (139.67 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)

Dates and versions

hal-03474223 , version 1 (10-12-2021)

Identifiers

Cite

Jeremy Bellien, Erwan Bozec, Frédéric Bounoure, Hakim Khettab, Julie Malloizel-Delaunay, et al.. The effect of camelina oil on vascular function in essential hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2022, 115 (3), pp.694-704. ⟨10.1093/ajcn/nqab374⟩. ⟨hal-03474223⟩
124 View
57 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More