Long-term monitoring of benthic invertebrate communities in a highly invaded ecosystem, the Mosel River - Université de Lorraine Access content directly
Conference Papers Year : 2022

Long-term monitoring of benthic invertebrate communities in a highly invaded ecosystem, the Mosel River

Abstract

Exotic species, once established in the recipient ecosystem, can established and, in some cases, become invasive. However, long-term monitoring of invaded ecosystems remains quite rare, while it’s the unique method to describe and understand how local communities adapt -or not- to the continuous fluxes of new exotic invasive species, and how these exotic species manage to persist within these local communities. Some species’ proliferations can indeed be only transitory, with sometimes their disappearance, either naturally or through the interaction with a newcomer. The Mosel River, located in North-eastern France, is studied since 1994 with the same protocol to investigate benthic macroinvertebrates communities. It is one of the main corridors for aquatic invasions in France, with near to 20 exotic invertebrate species, mainly molluscans and crustaceans, established within its biocenosis. Benthic communities were investigated 13 times between 1994 and 2021, by dredge-sampling from a boat at four stations in spring and/or autumn. Our results evidenced strong modifications of community composition over years, while structure index showed a come-back of 2021 structure to that identified in 1996, that is however not a pre-invasion state. We also evidenced that the species richness did not increase with the increasing number of exotic species, suggesting that newcomers took the place of species already there, and did not colonize a vacant niche. The investigation of trophic groups showed communities strongly dominated by parasites and predators in 1994, filter-feeder and detritivore from 1996 to 2001, and a stabilization of the relative abundance of the different groups in recent years. Such observation strategies need to be developed in other systems for a better description of exotic species dynamic, especially now that global change is potentially accelerating migration of species.
No file

Dates and versions

hal-03960760 , version 1 (27-01-2023)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-03960760 , version 1

Cite

Simon Devin, Jonathan Bouquerel, Sandrine Pain-Devin. Long-term monitoring of benthic invertebrate communities in a highly invaded ecosystem, the Mosel River. International Conference on Aquatic Invasive Species, Apr 2022, Ostende, Belgium. ⟨hal-03960760⟩
13 View
0 Download

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More