Is microfluidics a good option to produce alginate microparticles encapsulating a fragile hydrophilic drug? - Université de Lorraine Access content directly
Conference Papers Year : 2024

Is microfluidics a good option to produce alginate microparticles encapsulating a fragile hydrophilic drug?

Abstract

S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a physiological nitric oxide donor, with has proved to be effective in preclinical and clinical studies in various conditions. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of this hydrophilic drug hinders its use in therapeutics. While several formulations of GSNO have been reported in the literature, none of them, to the best of our knowledge, was produced with microfluidics. In this study, we produced alginate microparticles encapsulating GSNO from the droplets of a water-in-oil emulsion generated in a microfluidic chip (flow focusing junction) and then solidified off-chip by ionotropic gelation with calcium ions. With a low viscosity alginate, polymer concentrations up to 4.5 % (w/v) could be used without clogging. The emulsion step was fully controlled by the microfluidic system, generating droplets with a homogeneous size distribution (polydispersity index < 0.2), much narrower than the results obtained with a batch emulsification with a stirring blade. Mean size of droplets can be adjusted while playing on the aqueous (W) and oily (O) phases flow rates, with an almost linear relationship between the size of droplets and the W/O flow rates ratio, up to a 0.5 ratio after which there is no more droplet formation. At constant W/O ratio, droplets of similar sizes could be obtained for various couples of W and O flow rates (in green in Fig 1). Interestingly, the resulting particles have all similar GSNO encapsulation efficiency (around 24%) but their morphology varies according to the conditions of gelation (output flow rate, agitation of gelling bath…). To conclude, GSNO-microparticles were successfully produced with an emulsion/ionotropic gelation process, using a microfluidic device for the emulsion step. Control of the gelation step does not inflence the drug encapsulation. Nevertheless, it is also critical to maintain control over resulting particles morphology.
No file

Dates and versions

hal-04585150 , version 1 (23-05-2024)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-04585150 , version 1

Cite

Thomas Chaigneau, Asta-Ramaha Synthia Mackin-Mohamour, Véronique Sadtler, Thibault Roques-Carmes, Anne Sapin-Minet, et al.. Is microfluidics a good option to produce alginate microparticles encapsulating a fragile hydrophilic drug?. International Conference on Biomaterials and Biofabrication, May 2024, Nancy, France. ⟨hal-04585150⟩
0 View
0 Download

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More